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Pedagogy in Health Promotion

Pedagogy in Health Promotion

An Official Publication of the Society for Public Health Education
The Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

eISSN: 23733802 | ISSN: 23733799 | Current volume: 6 | Current issue: 3 Frequency: Quarterly

Subscribe to the 2016 Institutional Package for Health Education & Behavior, including Pedagogy in Health Promotion.

Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (PHP) advances pedagogy through contributions in areas such as curriculum and course/program design, assessment, and administration relevant to teaching and learning. The content of the journal is especially relevant to instructors or trainers who provide continuing professional education, in the broad arena of health promotion and disease prevention. The quarterly journal welcomes works addressing the art and science of teaching and learning, and how it contributes to the formation and ongoing development of the health promotion professional working in any site and with a range of populations.

Types of original research, descriptive best practices, commentaries, coaching articles, and thoughtful questions and ideas related to pedagogy considered by this journal include:

  • the linkage of the scholarship of teaching and learning to best practice in academic formation of health education specialists.
  • works by health professionals involved in teaching subjects related to health promotion, health education, public health and health care, especially related to population health.
  • quantitative or qualitative evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching modalities by educators in K-12 schools and at universities.
  • descriptive studies on how the curriculum meets public health and health education specialists’ competencies.
  • innovation for improved outcomes in the range of students’ experiential learning.
  • projects to meet the needs of a knowledgeable, skilled, and ethical public health and health care workforce.
  • innovation in using technology in the teaching/learning process.
  • works that present examples of alignment among research, teaching, and practice in the health promotion, public health, and health care fields.
  • issues related to academic or program administration, finance, policies, culture or climate that affects the teaching and learning environment.

Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning is one of three peer-reviewed journals published by the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE). Others include Health Education & Behavior and Health Promotion Practice. PHP is the first major journal dedicated to the broad topic of pre-service and continuing education of health professionals involved in health promotion and public health.

Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (PHP) advances pedagogy through contributions in areas such as curriculum and course/program design, assessment, and administration relevant to teaching and learning. The content of the journal is especially relevant to instructors or trainers who provide continuing professional education, in the broad arena of health promotion and disease prevention. The quarterly journal welcomes works addressing the art and science of teaching and learning, and how it contributes to the formation and ongoing development of the health promotion professional working in any site and with a range of populations.

Types of original research, descriptive best practices, commentaries, coaching articles, and thoughtful questions and ideas related to pedagogy considered by this journal include:

  • the linkage of the scholarship of teaching and learning to best practice in academic formation of health education specialists.
  • works by health professionals involved in teaching subjects related to health promotion, health education, public health and health care, especially related to population health.
  • quantitative or qualitative evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching modalities by educators in K-12 schools and at universities.
  • descriptive studies on how the curriculum meets public health and health education specialists’ competencies.
  • innovation for improved outcomes in the range of students’ experiential learning.
  • projects to meet the needs of a knowledgeable, skilled, and ethical public health and health care workforce.
  • innovation in using technology in the teaching/learning process.
  • works that present examples of alignment among research, teaching, and practice in the health promotion, public health, and health care fields.
  • issues related to academic or program administration, finance, policies, culture or climate that affects the teaching and learning environment.

Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning is one of three peer-reviewed journals published by the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE). Others include Health Education & Behavior and Health Promotion Practice. PHP is the first major journal dedicated to the broad topic of pre-service and continuing education of health professionals involved in health promotion and public health.

Editor-in-Chief
Cheryl R. Merzel, DrPH, MPH New York University School of Global Public Health, USA
Editorial Board
Melissa (Moose) Alperin, EdD, MPH, MCHES Emory University, USA
Kelly M. Bentley, PhD, MPH University of Maine at Farmington, USA
Devin C. Bowles, PhD, MA Australian National University and Council of Academic Public Health Institutions Australasia (CAPHIA)
Marguerite C. Sendall, PhD, MHSc, IUHPE, RHPP Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Jody Early, PhD, MS, MCHES University of Washington Bothell, USA
Michael Fagen, PhD, MPH Northwestern University, USA
Amy Hedman-Robertson, PhD, MS University of St. Thomas, USA
Tyler G. James, MS, CHES University of Florida, USA
Heather Lysbeth Henderson, EdD West Virginia University, USA
Pradeep Nair, PhD, MA Central University of Himachal Pradesh, India
Krishna Regmi, PhD, MPH, MMEd University of Bedfordshire, UK
Ronica Rooks, PhD, MA University of Colorado, Denver, USA
Gayle Walter, PhD, CHES University of Iowa, USA
Editor Emeritus
Editorial Manager
Jeanine Robitaille, MS Society for Public Health Education, USA
  • ProQuest
  • Guidelines for Prospective Authors

    Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    An Official Journal of the Society for Public Health Education


     

    A Note From the Editorial Staff

    Thank you for considering publication of your scholarly work in Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. As you know, the process of dissemination of scholarly work via a peer reviewed journal is quite involved. There are a number of important principles, guidelines, and processes that we consider before publishing a body of work. We understand that preparing a manuscript for submission to a journal is tedious, even when using today’s electronic submission systems. Frankly, as authors we know there are always nuances to the submission process, regardless of how many manuscripts we have submitted and to how many journals.

    The PHP editorial staff requests that certain steps be taken by authors and reviewers in order to ensure that Pedagogy in Health Promotion messages reach recipients in a timely manner. To ensure that PHP emails are not filtering into your “Bulk” or “Spam” folders, please indicate that Pedagogy in Health Promotion is a safe email sender in your email account settings.

    We hope you find the set of guidelines in this document helpful. Please provide us with your feedback if there are ways we can increase clarity and effectiveness in our publication process. Dissemination of your work in a scholarly journal can be an amiable conversation. Feel free to contact the Editor in Chief, our experienced Editorial Board members, or our Editorial Manager during the process of conception, writing, review, and submission of your work.

    Purpose Statement for the Journal

    Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (PHP) advances pedagogy through contributions in areas such as curriculum and course/program design, assessment, and administration relevant to the teaching and learning process with preprofessional students and continuing professional education. The quarterly journal welcomes works addressing the art and science of teaching and learning, and how it contributes to the formation and ongoing development of the health promotion professional working in any site and with a range of populations. We welcome submissions from all countries and global regions. The content of the journal is relevant to faculty working in professional preparation programs and to instructors or trainers who provide continuing professional education in the broad arena of public health, health promotion, and disease prevention. Submissions must address the areas above; we do not accept works addressing solely clinical training (for an understanding of the health education field, see Auld & Gambescia, 2011, Annotated Bibliography for Health Education).

    Examples of the types of original research, descriptive best practices, commentaries, coaching articles, and thoughtful questions, ideas, and perspectives related to pedagogy considered by this journal include:

    • The linkage of the scholarship of teaching and learning to best practice in academic formation of health education specialists or public health professionals
    • Works by health professionals involved in teaching subjects related to health promotion, health education, public health, and health care, especially related to population health
    • Quantitative or qualitative evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching modalities by educators in K-12 schools and at universities
    • Descriptive studies on how the curriculum meets public health and health education specialists’ competencies
    • Innovation for improved outcomes in the range of students’ experiential learning
    • Projects to meet the needs of a knowledgeable, skilled, and ethical public health and health care workforce
    • Innovation in using technology in the teaching/ learning process
    • Works that present examples of alignment among research, teaching, and practice in the health pro- motion, public health, and health care fields
    • Issues related to academic or program administration, finance, policies, culture, or climate that affects the teaching and learning environment

    PHP is indexed and abstracted in Index Medicus, CINAHL database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Combined Health Information Database, Social Services Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts. The entire journal editorial process is managed online at mc.manuscriptcentral.com/PiHP

    Please note that submitting a manuscript to ScholarOne does not guarantee its inclusion in the peer-review process. All manuscripts undergo an initial review by the Editor in Chief, Dr. Cheryl Merzel, and select members of the Editorial Board, who may reject them before peer review if the submission does not meet the purpose and editorial guidelines of the journal or does not meet a reasonable quality standard for submission to a peer review journal.

    PHP adheres to a rigorous double-blind reviewing policy in which the identity of the reviewers and authors are concealed. The Editor or members of the Editorial Board may occasionally submit their own manuscripts for possible publication in the journal. In these cases, the peer review process will be managed by alternative members of the Board and the submitting Editor/Board member will have no involvement in the decision-making process.

    Submit a manuscript to Pedagogy in Health Promotion through our online manuscript submission, review, and monitoring system, ScholarOne, at: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/PiHP

    Manuscript Types, General Content Areas (Constructs), and Format Guidelines

    Please read the full set of guidelines and instructions for authors before submitting your manuscript to PHP. When considering the development and submission of manuscripts to Pedagogy in Health Promotion, the journal’s purpose statement should be considered.

    Please follow these article length guidelines below, based on the type of manuscript you are submitting.

    • Original Research both qualitative and quantitative (up to 7,000 words; works based on scholarly research)
    • Descriptive Best Practices (up to 3,000 words; detailed examination of educational practices; e.g., curriculum development and implementation, and lessons for the field)
    • Commentaries (750 to 1,200 words; short well- written articles discussing contemporary issues in the field)
    • Coaching Articles (3,000 words; peer-to-peer guidance in the teaching/learning process)
    • Perspectives on Pedagogy Thoughtful questions and ideas related to pedagogy (up to 2,000 words; big picture and provocative pieces that influence the field)
    • Editorials (750 to 1,200 words; essays from editorial board members on observations of the field, and areas to consider, examine, or correct)
    • Reflective Pieces (up to 2,000 words First person reflection by educators and students about the teaching/learning process)

    Articles are generally categorized around six (6) major content areas. You will be asked to specify these content areas (constructs) during your submission:

    1. Instruction
    2. Curriculum and Course Design
    3. Assessment/Evaluation
    4. Experiential Learning
    5. Administrative
    6. The Art and Science of Teaching/Learning

    N. B. This journal does not publish episodic work or “one-and-done” teaching strategies unless there is a compelling and novel contribution. Two articles to review to get a sense for the types of articles that meet the purpose of “The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning” are the following:

    ”The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Origin, Development, and Implications for Pedagogy in Health Promotion” by Leslie Gail McBride and Amar S. Kanekar, Vol. 1, No. 1. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2373379914557498

    ”Message From the Editorial Board: Making Sure the ‘Scholarship’ Is in Our Submissions to Pedagogy in Health Promotion” by Adriana C. de Aguiar. Vol. 3, No. 3 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/237337 9917727272

    • Recognizing that much of the health science literature uses English as the universal language today, PHP only accepts manuscripts in English. We understand the challenge authors may have when English is their second language. We highly recommend that these authors use a professional translation and editing service. For information on a nonaffiliated service contact the PHP Editorial Manager.
    • Manuscripts must be typed, double-spaced, page numbered, and written in Times New Roman, 12-point font, following APA style.
    • For length, see above information related to the type of article. NOTE: You may only exceed this word count if reviewers request revisions that require additional information and if the Editor in Chief agrees.
    • No more than 35 references
    • No more than 4 figures, which must be submitted in black and white printed at 1,200 dpi or better
    • One inch margins on all sides of document
    • Number each page, including the abstract, in the upper right hand corner
    • Number every line of the manuscript in the left margin
    • Provide a word count at the end of your abstract and in the Cover Page
    • Title Page includes
      • Title of article
      • Name, title, and affiliation of each author; list authors in order of contribution or if alpha, state so. Indicate who is the submitting or corresponding author. Affiliation example:

    Jane J. Jones, PhD, is Chair of Community Health Education at St. Elsewhere College in Podonk, State (USA). (Longer bios will be edited to fit this example.)

    • Acknowledgements and funding sources
      • Cover Letter addressed to the Editor in Chief, Dr. Cheryl Merzel. In this letter, indicate:
        • Statement that you have read and followed these guidelines for authors
        • If material in this article appears in another publication
        • If the SOTL activity has received IRB approval. If not needed state why
        • That this article is not under consideration elsewhere and in any format and in any part. (If the manuscript has been previously submitted elsewhere and rejected, please indicate the name of the publication and the decision offered by the journal.) Please briefly explain how this submission is different, if any, from the previous submission
        • Whether you are submitting for a standard issue of PHP, in response to a certain “Call for Papers,” or you are an invited author
        • List of authors with full contact information and in order of appearance, if published
        • Note any clear or potential conflicts of interest with the submission
        • Sort statement of significance of the work and fit with the purpose of the journal
        • State at least one of the six major categorical content areas mentioned above
        • Type of article (e.g., original research, best practice, commentary, etc.)
        • Title of article
    • Author(s), their affiliations, and any other information linking the work to the authors must be placed in the title page document and cover letter ONLY, and the title page MUST be a separate document from the manuscript. Use a pseudo name or blanks in the manuscript to disguise an educational organization, agency, or person, etc., so as not to divulge author(s)’ identity. This includes the entity giving IRB approval.
    • Abstract are unstructured, and must not exceed 250 words. This is pasted in a box during your submission, and you must include it in the front of the manuscript as the first page.
    • Keywords; no more than four. Please pay close attention to best practices of assigning key words and that this is a pedagogy journal. See SAGE’s resource at http://www.sagepub.com/journalgate way/findArticle.htm
    • Classification Constructs: As you submit your manuscript in ScholarOne, you will see that it requests classifications to be selected on your article. Please choose three to five categories that best fit the topic areas of your article. This is in addition to your keywords.
    • The entire manuscript including references and in-text citations mist be written according to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 7th edition. Citations in the text should use the author-date method inserted at the appropriate point and are listed alphabetically in the reference section in APA style. We recognize the time commitment and tedious nature of APA style writing, citation and referencing, Authors may want to consult significant work conducted by Anthony J. Onwueghbuzie and colleagues who are identifying the most common citation, referencing, and overall APA errors being made in manuscripts submitted to academic journals.

    Funding

    PHP requires all authors to acknowledge their funding in a consistent fashion under a separate heading. Please visit the Funding Acknowledgements page on the SAGE Journal Author Gateway to confirm the format of the acknowledgment text in the event of funding, or state that: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

    Declaration of Conflicting Interests

    It is the policy of PHP to require a declaration of conflicting interests from all authors enabling a statement to be carried within the paginated pages of all published articles.

    Please ensure that a ‘Declaration of Conflicting Interests’ statement is included at the end of your manuscript, after any acknowledgements and prior to the references. If no conflict exists, please state that ‘The Author(s) declare(s) that there is no conflict of interest’. For guidance on conflict of interest statements, please see the ICMJE recommendations here.

    Upon manuscript acceptance, you will be required to electronically sign a transfer of copyright form on behalf of the authors—except in the case of Work Made for Hire. In this case, an employer’s signature is required. The copyright form is available on PHP’s ScholarOne site. Please print, sign, and fax the form back to the PHP Editorial Manager at (202)-408-9815. (N.B. Write the name of your manuscript on the form.)

    Research Ethics and Patient Consent

    Medical research involving human subjects must be conducted according to the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki.

    Submitted manuscripts should conform to the ICMJE Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals, and all papers reporting animal and/or human studies must state in the methods section that the relevant ethics committee or institutional review board provided (or waived) approval. Please ensure that you have provided the full name and institution of the review committee, in addition to the approval number.

    For research articles, authors are also required to state in the methods section whether participants provided informed consent and whether the consent was written or verbal.

    Information on informed consent to report individual cases or case series should be included in the manuscript text. A statement is required regarding whether written informed consent for patient information and images to be published was provided by the patient(s) or a legally authorized representative. Please do not submit the patient’s actual written informed consent with your article, as this in itself breaches the patient’s confidentiality. The Journal requests that you confirm to us, in writing, that you have obtained written informed consent but the written consent itself should be held by the authors/investigators themselves, for example in a patient’s hospital record. The confirmatory letter may be uploaded with your submission as a separate file.

    Please also refer to the ICMJE Recommendations for the Protection of Research Participants.

    Clinical Trials

    PHP conforms to the ICMJE requirement that clinical trials are registered in a WHO-approved public trials registry at or before the time of first patient enrolment as a condition of consideration for publication. The trial registry name and URL, and registration number must be included at the end of the abstract.

    Reporting Guidelines

    The relevant EQUATOR Network reporting guidelines should be followed depending on the type of study. For example, all randomized controlled trials submitted for publication should include a completed CONSORT flow chart as a cited figure and the completed CONSORT checklist should be uploaded with your submission as a supplementary file. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses should include the completed PRISMA flow chart as a cited figure and the completed PRISMA checklist should be uploaded with your submission as a supplementary file. The EQUATOR wizard can help you identify the appropriate guideline.

    Other resources can be found at NLM’s Research Reporting Guidelines and Initiatives.

    All manuscripts not submitted in the correct reference/citation style will be returned to the author.

    Tables, Charts, Figures, and Graphs

    Tables, charts, figures, and graphs must be submitted in black and white and printed at 1,200 dpi or better. PowerPoint, Excel, and Word are encouraged. Tables, Figures, etc., should be placed at the end of the paper— placement notations can be made throughout the text (e.g., “Insert Figure 1 here”). Please submit images exactly as you wish to see them when published.

    No more than a total of 4 figures/tables/images per article can be published in a print issue of the journal. However, authors may submit additional supplementary files/appendices to be posted with the online version of the article.

    Photos and Grayscale Images

    Photos and grayscale images should be scanned in the size they will appear in the journal, or larger. Photos are best sent as originals or scanned in at the correct size and resolution (300 dpi).

    Research Data

    At SAGE we are committed to facilitating openness, transparency and reproducibility of research. Where relevant, PHP encourages authors to share their research data in a suitable public repository subject to ethical considerations and where data is included, to add a data accessibility statement in their manuscript file. Authors should also follow data citation principles. For more information please visit the SAGE Author Gateway, which includes information about SAGE’s partnership with the data repository Figshare.

    OnlineFirst/Publish Ahead of Print

    Pedagogy in Health Promotion uses OnlineFirst, a SAGE Journals Online feature through which final articles are published online prior to their inclusion in a print issue (also referred to as “publishing ahead of print”). This feature offers you the advantage of making your research accessible to our readers and the public in a timely manner. For your information, “FAQs about OnlineFirst” can be found on the Pedagogy in Health Promotion ScholarOne® website at mc.manuscriptcentral.com/PiHP. During the production process each manuscript is assigned a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), a unique identification number similar to the ISBN assigned to book publications. (You can find this number on the top right-hand corner of the first page of your proofs.) While available through OnlineFirst (i.e., before the publication in a journal issue), your manuscript should be cited using the DOI as the following example:

    Chaney, B., Elmore, L., Paravattil, B., Lysoby, L. Rehrig, M., & Gambescia, S. F. (2012, September 18). A summative report of applications submitted for the experience documentation opportunity for the master certified health education specialist credential. Health Promotion Practice. Advance online publication. doi:10.1177/1524839912455176

    After the article is assigned to a specific issue, new cita- tions can be made using updated year, volume, and page number information, while still using the DOI:

    B., Elmore, L., Paravattil, B., Lysoby, L. Rehrig, M., & Gambescia, S. F. (2013). A summative report of applications submitted for the experience documentation opportunity for the master certified health education specialist credential. Health Promotion Practice, 14, 354- 363. doi:10.1177/1524839912455176

    Other Important Editorial Guidelines

    Use of the terms “health education” and “health promotion”: Some authors may not see a difference between these two terms used in the field; others have distinct definitions. (See Downie, Tannahill, & Tannahill, 1996, Health Promotion: Models and Values.) Authors should use what- ever term meets the context of the article and be consistent. Avoid use of “health education/promotion.”

    Use the term “health education specialist” to identify a professionally prepared health educator (PPHE). A professionally prepared health educator is one who has (1) completed a degree program in health education and/or (2) earned the Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) or Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES) certification from the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (Gambescia et al., 2009, p. 497). The Report of the 2011 Joint Committee on Health Education and Promotion Terminology writes that a Health Education Specialist is

    an individual who has met, at a minimum, baccalaureate- level required health education academic preparation qualifications, who serves in a variety of settings, and is able to use appropriate educational strategies and methods to facilitate the development of policies, procedures, interventions, and systems conduce to the health of individuals, groups and communities. (American Association for Health Education, 2012, p. 18)

    Other health professionals engaging in health education or health promotion should be named according to their health profession designation.

    Use of the terms “college, university, and institutions of higher education.” Avoid use of the term “institution or institutions” when referring to colleges and universities. When writing about a particular higher education entity, use the specific name for that entity, that is, “college” if it is St. Elsewhere College or “university” if it is Podonk University. A strict historical understanding distinguishes colleges from universities. (See Richard A. DeMillo, 2011, in Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities.) When referring to these entities in the collective, authors should make a choice that meets the context of the article and be consistent. Avoid use of “colleges/universities.”

    Reminder to use a comma before “and” in a string of terms—for example: . . . knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors . . .—unless the final two elements are seen as a combination. This is in accordance to APA style (American Psychological Association, 2010).

    References

    American Association for Health Education. (2012). The report of the 2011 Joint Committee on Health Education & Promotion Terminology. Reston, VA: Author.

    American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication man- ual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

    Auld, E., & Gambescia, S. F. (2011). Annotated bibliography for health education (Oxford Bibliographies Online). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

    DeMillo, R. A. (2011). Abelard to apple: The fate of American colleges and universities. Cambridge: MIT Press.

    Downie, R. S., Tannahill, C., & Tannahill, A. (1996). Health promotion: Models and values. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.

    Gambescia, S. F., Cotrell, R. R., Capwell, E., Auld, M. E., Conley, K., Lysoby, L., . . .Smith, B. (2009). Marketing the professionally prepared health educator to employ- ers. Health Promotion Practice. 10(4), 495-504. doi:10.1177/1524839909339583

    As the corresponding author on your manuscript, you will automatically receive a separate email notification with detailed information about the article once it has been assigned to an issue.

     

    Author Checklist Before Submitting

    1. Have you ensured that your manuscript aligns with the purpose statement of PHP?
    2. Does your submission meet the PHP guidelines?
    3. Did you create a Title Page?
    4. Does your Cover Letter have all components? Does it clarify if there is a conflict of interest and whether the program has received IRB approval?
    5. Do your references comply with the APA 6th ed. format?
    6. Have you noted where any tables or figures should be inserted within the text? That is, “— insert Table 1 here—”
    7. Have you blinded all identifying information, such as identity of authors and funding?

     

    Serving as a Peer Reviewer

    The high quality of the articles that appear in PHP directly relate to the expertise and dedication of our reviewers. You may want to consider serving as a peer reviewer for PHP. An “active reviewer” is one who reviews at least two articles per calendar year. This type of service is eligible for continuing education contact hours for CHES and MCHES and may be applicable for other health professions. Each year, reviewers are acknowledged in an issue of the journal. Applicants should meet the following minimum requirements:

    • Have more than a passing interest in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of your teaching
    • Understand the basics to the field of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
    • Be able to provide useful, constructive, professional, and appropriate comments to colleagues submitting works for publication
    • Meet deadlines to give authors timely response and feedback to their work
    • Have at least five peer-reviewed articles published; several must be in the area of teaching and learning
    • At a minimum, hold a master’s degree in a relevant field

    For consideration as a peer reviewer, send cover letter and CV to Dr. Cheryl Merzel, Editor in Chief, PHP, at cm3912@nyu.edu. State in your cover letter your experience as matched in the criteria listed above, your general interest in the area of Pedagogy, and your specific areas of expertise. After a review of your mate- rials and if you are selected, you will be asked to complete a profile account in our ScholarOne manuscript review system.

    ORCID

    As part of our commitment to ensuring an ethical, transparent and fair peer review process SAGE is a supporting member of ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID. ORCID provides a unique and persistent digital identifier that distinguishes researchers from every other researcher, even those who share the same name, and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between researchers and their professional activities, ensuring that their work is recognized.

    The collection of ORCID IDs from corresponding authors is now part of the submission process of this journal. If you already have an ORCID ID you will be asked to associate that to your submission during the online submission process. We also strongly encourage all co-authors to link their ORCID ID to their accounts in our online peer review platforms. It takes seconds to do: click the link when prompted, sign into your ORCID account and our systems are automatically updated. Your ORCID ID will become part of your accepted publication’s metadata, making your work attributable to you and only you. Your ORCID ID is published with your article so that fellow researchers reading your work can link to your ORCID profile and from there link to your other publications.

    If you do not already have an ORCID ID please follow this link to create one or visit our ORCID homepage to learn more.

    PHP Editorial Office Contacts:

    Editorial Manager Jeanine Robitaille, MS
    Society for Public Health Education
    10 G Street, NE, Suite 605
    Washington, DC 20002-4242
    Phone: 202-408-9815
    Fax: 202-408-9815
    Email: jrobitaille@sophe.org

    Editor in Chief Cheryl Merzel, DrPH, MPH
    School of Global Public Health
    New York University
    715 Broadway
    12th Floor
    New York, NY 10003
    Phone: 212-9926143
    Email: cm3912@nyu.edu

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